Trying to solve a problem before being taught the solution enhances learning

Another counterintuitive point (see The most effective learning strategies are not intuitiveThe most effective learning strategies are not intuitive
Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learningBook - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning

Metadata:

author: Peter C. Brown
title: Make it stick: the science of successful learning



raises that point that students struggle to learn effectively, because the most effective learning strategies are counterintuitive at f...
) from Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learningBook - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning

Metadata:

author: Peter C. Brown
title: Make it stick: the science of successful learning



: Being asked to solve a problem before being taught how to do it actually improves learning. The book calls this "Priming the Mind for Learning".

Unsuccessful attempts to solve a problem encourage deep processing of the answer when it is later supplied, creating fertile ground for its encoding, in a way that simply reading the answer cannot.

The book presents the following evidence for the claim

Richland LE, Kornell N, Kao LS. The pretesting effect: do unsuccessful retrieval attempts enhance learning? J Exp Psychol Appl. 2009 Sep;15(3):243-57. doi: 10.1037/a0016496. PMID: 19751074.

Furthermore, when the answer can be deducted through trial and error, this philosophy leads to a technique called "generative learning" (compare: "The Generation Effect" when learning).