Task switching makes multitasking more expensive than the sum of its parts

As Cal Newport reports in Book - Deep Work.. 3 Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted WorldBook - Deep Work.. 3 Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World

Metadata:

author: Cal Newport
title: Deep Work: rules for focused success in a distracted world




, task switching leaves a residue of attention at our last task, costing more attention as a result (scientific citation needed). As shallow work tasks often are short distractions, switching between them and deeper work tasks wastes a lot of unnecessary mental resources.

This phenomenon can also be explained as Unfinished tasks occupy our mind more strongly than finished tasksUnfinished tasks occupy our mind more strongly than finished tasks

In psychology, this fact is referred to as the Zeigarnik effect, which postulates that people remember unfinished or interrupted tasks better than completed tasks.
[[Book - How to Take Smart N...
, but Newport explicitly states that even finished tasks get a bit of attention residue.

This idea could be another argument for Attention is the new goldAttention is the new gold

Heavily WIP Zettel, as this hypothesis is still pretty early in development but could be the core of my strategy and research going forward
I conclude that the attention of people will become/...

This idea is at odds with the idea of interleaved practice presented in make it stick (link missing)