Retrieval practice is an effective learning strategy

Retrieval practice, as described in Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learningBook - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning

Metadata:

author: Peter C. Brown
title: Make it stick: the science of successful learning



: Recalling facts, concepts, or events from memory.

The book pulls from many studies to show that getting tested on material is one of the best ways to strengthen our memory by far. One example is a meta analysis from 2013, comparing multiple common studying techniques: dunloskyImprovingStudentsLearning2013dunloskyImprovingStudentsLearning2013

Metadata:

author: John Dunlosky, Katherine A. Rawson, Elizabeth J. Marsh, Mitchell J. Nathan, Daniel T. Willingham
title: Improving Students’ Learning With Effective Learning Te...

One explanation for this phenomenon could be that Learning is more efficient when it is effortfulLearning is more efficient when it is effortful
One of the main points of [[Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning]] is that learning is actually deeper and more durable when it is harder

the more effort you have to expend to...

Testing ourselves via retrieval practice also helps mitigate misconceptions about how well we know the material, see The illusion of knowing hinders us when studyingThe illusion of knowing hinders us when studying
The authors of [[Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning]] highlight a common problem: Students tend to confuse familiarity with mastery of a topic.

This ''illusion of knowing" i...

Reflection if another form of retrieval practice, so it follows that Reflecting on past performances makes improving at any skill way fasterReflecting on past performances makes improving at any skill way faster

Sitting down once a day/week to reflect on our performance and the things that we learned makes a huge difference in improving at any given skill, but we rarely have the discipline to do it.
I...
. Also, when the retrieval practice matches the later application of the problem, it is more effective (see: Practice like you play and you will play like you practicePractice like you play and you will play like you practice
[[Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning]] several papers that support the idea that the best kind of retrieval practice is that one that reflects what you will be doing later ("...
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Using flashcards (Anki, Quizlet) to study means that one can get both the benefits of retrieval and those of spacing (see: Spacing out practice of a topic produces better learningSpacing out practice of a topic produces better learning
Another of [[Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning]]'s main points is that leaving time between repetitions of specific topics or skills produces both longer lasting learning an...
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Video - How to Study Using the Generation Effect $ Psych of PlayVideo - How to Study Using the Generation Effect $ Psych of Play

Metadata:

author: Daryl Talks Games




title: How to Study Using the Generation Effect
Psych of Play

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by Daryl Talks Games illustrates this concept in the context of video games: Only reading the textbook and going to the exam ist like playing the tutorial and going straight to the final boss. Therefore, we need to test ourselves in order to create the "rest of the game". It also gives a concrete example of how recall appears naturally in video games: Almost every child that plays Pokémon knows the type chart by heart, which is impressive, considering we are speaking about a 18x18 matrix resulting in 324 possible attack vs defense combinations. However, they learn it in a highly effective manner, as every single attack is a retrieval problem on the attacks effectiveness.