Paper - Motion tracking of parents’ infant‐ versus adult‐directed actions reveals general and action‐specific modulations

  • Metadata:
    • author: Johanna E. van Schaik, Marlene Meyer, Camila R. van Ham, Sabine Hunnius
    • title: Motion tracking of parents' infant- versus adult-directed actions reveals general and action-specific modulations
    • year: 20202020

  • It was found that parents modulate their movements when demonstrating actions to their infants. These so called motionese have been observed and described in previous studies.
  • However, there hasn't been an accurate/objective measure for these movement modulations. This paper fixes this by using optical motion tracking to analyze the parents movements in multiple dimensions.
  • They were interested how these action modulations were differed when interacting with their infant vs when interacting with an adult. They also looked at modulations that occured over many different actions and those that only occured for specific actions.
  • Parents presented novel objects to their infants with the goal of teaching them about an action that produced an effect (e.g. shake it so the object rattles)
  • The study used motion cameras with marker attachments in order to capture movements.
  • They found that for infants, parents
    • covered more 3d distance while demonstrating the object
    • demonstrated the action closer to the infant
    • demonstrated the effect longer
    • repeated the demonstrations
    • were either faster or slower when presenting an action, depending on the handled object.
  • The paper suggests that motionese is beneficial to the learning process, however the data they collected was too noisy to make definitive statements.