Linear writing is multitasking

  • Ever step of the writing process is easy: Editing a draft, connecting finished arguments to make a draft, arranging arguments into an outline, turning notes and thoughts into arguments and taking notes from what you read, think or find. (Book - How to Take Smart NotesBook - How to Take Smart Notes

    Metadata:

    author: Sönke Ahrens
    title: How to take smart notes: one simple technique to boost writing, learning and thinking: for students, academics and nonfiction book writers
    ...
    )
    • This is exhausting, as Task switching makes multitasking more expensive than the sum of its partsTask switching makes multitasking more expensive than the sum of its parts
      As Cal Newport reports in [[Book - Deep Work.. 3 Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World]], task switching leaves a residue of attention at our last task, costing more attention as a result...
  • Utilizing a Zettelkasten approach modifies your environment and makes you naturally gravitate towards this writing style
  • According to Book - How to Take Smart NotesBook - How to Take Smart Notes

    Metadata:

    author: Sönke Ahrens
    title: How to take smart notes: one simple technique to boost writing, learning and thinking: for students, academics and nonfiction book writers
    ...
    , writing becomes hard when we do it in a linear fashion. Our brain constantly switches between intaking new information, structuring, drafting, and editing. This is multitasking by definition, which was shown to be unproductive behavior by various studies.
  • If you become successful in your research, it was not because you wrote using the convectional top down approach, but despite doing it this way.