It is nearly impossible to avoid basing one's judgement on subjective experience

Humans do not believe objective accounts of events over their subjective remembering of it and we often underestimate the uniqueness of our situational construals. (The constructivist worlds views discussed in my psychology lectures would fit nicely here)

The fact that it is basically impossible to separate our judgement from our subjective experiences was explored in many studies.

L. Jacoby, R. A. Bjork, & C. M. Kelley, Illusions of comprehension, competence, and remembering, in D. Druckman & R. A. Bjork (eds.), Learning, remembering, believing: Enhancing human per for mance (pp. 57– 80) (Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1994).

Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learningBook - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning

Metadata:

author: Peter C. Brown
title: Make it stick: the science of successful learning



presents the above source in an argument that Cognitive biases cloud our judgement when it comes to learningCognitive biases cloud our judgement when it comes to learning
As Richard Feynman famously said:

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself — and you are the easiest person to fool.


[[Book - Make it stick.. the science of successful learning]] a...
. They further argue that

Memory is a reconstruction. We cannot remember every aspect of an event, so we remember those elements that have greatest emotional significance for us, and we fill in the gaps with details of our own that are consistent with our narrative but may be wrong.